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RAGGING-CAN BE GIVEN A MORE POSITIVE DIRECTION
posted on 02 May 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
PARENTS MUST HAVE REALISTIC EXPECTIONS
posted on 02 May 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
SOCIALISATION -THE FOUNDATION 0F HUMAN LIFE
posted on 29 Apr 2009
by:lalit kumar
CBSE Multimedia Animated CD DVD : Free Delivery Dial 01164614067
posted on 28 Mar 2009
by:TopRank India
JUST PASS IT ON..........
posted on 24 Mar 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
SHARING-THE BEST WAY TO GO!
posted on 24 Mar 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
OBESITY ON THE RISE IN CHILDREN
posted on 24 Mar 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
INSTILL HEALTHY EATING HABITS IN YOUR CHILDREN
posted on 24 Mar 2009
by:anshu chaudhry
Schoolsonweb
posted on 20 Feb 2009
by:Poo
DEALING WITH MOOD SWINGS!!!:-(
posted on 15 Feb 2009
by:priyannkaa dey
 
Featured Experiments
1 Method of Initial Rates at the molecular level
2 A ball climb up another object on a frictionless surface
Because there is no friction between objects and between object and the ground.
The total momentum in the horizontal direction must be conserved.
Try with different initial velocity and water how the motion changed!
The total energy of the system is always conserved,too!
3 Internal Combustion Engine
4 Illusion
The simulation is running with 20 frames per second.
Initially, those particles are rotated with small frequency(large period).
You can adjust frequency(period) with slide bar.
When you increase the frequency, particle move faster.
However, it seems that the direction of rotation is changing? Why?
At some particle frequency(f=10 or period T=0.1), those particle seems to be freeze (not moving at all)?
Do you know why?
5 Electrochemical Cell- Electrolysis
6 Electrochemical Concentration Cells
7 Particle attached to a spring in a horizontal plane
A small sphere of mass m is attached to one end of a spring.
Another end of the spring is fixed at point O.
This applet simulate how the particle moves with different initial velocity.
(You can drag red arrow to change the velocity of the particle when the simulation is paused.)
8 Oscillations: Damped and forced
Oscillations Damped and forced oscillations: resonance (k) describe graphically how the amplitude of a forced oscillation changes with frequency near to the natural frequency of the system, and understand qualitatively the factors which determine the frequency response and sharpness of the resonance.



When the driving frequency is equal to the natural frequency of the oscillating system, maximum energy is transferred from the periodic force (driver) to the oscillating system which will vibrate with maximum amplitude. This phenomenon is called resonance.



Frequency Response Graph (under different degrees of damping)

The Effect of Damping on Forced Oscillations

When damping is present, it reduces the amplitude (y-axis) of the forced oscillation for all driver frequencies (x-axis) and it causes the maximum amplitude to be reached when the driving frequency is a little less than the natural frequency.

This reduction in amplitude is more significant at the resonance frequency and frequencies close to it, so that we say damping reduces the sharpness of resonance -- that is, the oscillating system responses little (small change in the amplitude) over a wide range of frequencies.
9 Law of reflection
The law of reflection tell us:
The angle of incidence equals the angle of reflection.
If you change the orientation of the mirror by angle X,
 the angle of incident and the angle of reflection will both change X.
So, the angle of the reflected ray changes by 2X.
You can drag the light source(with mouse) to change the incident angle,too.
10 Coriolis force
The Coriolis force is a fictitious force exerted on a body when it moves in a rotating reference frame. It is called a fictitious force because it is a by-product of measuring coordinates with respect to a rotating coordinate system as opposed to an actual "push or pull."

This applet simulate particles motions observed from an inertia frame and rotating frame.
The spherical body will rotate when you press "play" button.
The red arrows are velocity vectors at different points on the spherical surface.
Press "jump" to shoot out particles.
You can use mouse to change the 3D view.

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